Marx’s” Manifesto of the Communist Party”

” All history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles”

From this sentence, Marx explains that throughout history the minority ruling class always exploited the majority working class. The Communist Manifesto outlines the class struggle between two social classes:  Burgeoisie and Proletariat that resulted from the Industrial Revolution that led to the development of Capitalism and the susbstitution of manual labour by machinery.

Marx criticizes the impact of Capitalism on society which led to comsumerism and class antagonism. Consequently, he offers communism as a solution whose main aim is creating a classless society.

In The Little Cask by Maupassant, the concept of Capitalism appeared through the character of Chicot who wanted to expand his land and the materialistic relationship between the two characters which is only based on money.

I think this book can be read in Modern times where capitalism and comsumerism invaded almost all societies. But on the other hand, when I think about Communist countries existing now as Cuba, China, Vietnam..etc. I see them unstable  and I don’t see Communism(nor any other political ideology) as the ultimate solution to the class struggle. Could it be a bad interpretation of Marx’s communist perspective?  or is it simply that there is no realistic solution for class antagonism?

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4 Responses to Marx’s” Manifesto of the Communist Party”

  1. R. Baptist says:

    Hi Doaa, interesting your blog. I think that the problem is in fact the word “ideology”. Maybe a philosophical-critical approach could be more productive in a nation? I really don’t know. About the Marx theory in Literature I think that we can studied inside the works of art, but also outside, you know, like how this works creates social schemas in the society…

  2. Brittany says:

    Could these modern-day Communist (or Socialist rather) societies be unstable in part due to the inability, or unwillingness, to interact with the rest of the world according to their terms, i.e., Capitalistic. No man is an island, and no country is completely autonomous – foreign exports and imports are a necessity for each society,without which a country would stagnate.

    • Span501 says:

      Brit:
      Doesn’t China export products all over the world? They are invading the world with their cheap products. Their population is spreading all over! They very well may take over pretty soon.
      Maybe only Cuba is isolated because they choose to (?). And even Cuba is communicating with other Latin American countries, just not with the US (for obvios reasons).
      They are all interacting with the world, but maybe they are being subordinated because they are weaker?

  3. Bill says:

    “But on the other hand, when I think about Communist countries existing now as Cuba, China, Vietnam..etc. I see them unstable and I don’t see Communism(nor any other political ideology) as the ultimate solution to the class struggle. ”

    I think you are pointing to a crucial debate that divided Stalin and Trotsky. It was resolved with a pick axe to Trotsky’s head (Stalin, always the practical one…). Trotsky said communism would never work unless it was global. Stalin said you have to start somewhere.

    I see the present state of communism as Trotsky’s response to Stalin: I was right; you were wrong.

    But in general, you have to give communism a chance. Christianity, capitalism, other world religions and ideologies have been around and abusing people for centuries, and they continue to be presented as viable alternatives. You would think that after the Inquisition, people would have said: “Christianity, well that obviously doesn’t work; let’s move on to Buddhism.” But the Catholic Church took everything in stride.

    But I’m not sure at what point an ideology shows itself to be definitively unhealthy. Maybe it is the nature of ideology to always defy proof.

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